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Connecting spaces

Using light to interpret transitions from the inside and outside

Combining rooms can create complex architectural patterns. Light interprets these in terms of their structure and orientation. Targeted lighting enables the viewer to look into an area and creates spatial depth. The consideration of material qualities in combination with the correct illuminance, colour of light and light distribution is an important aspect in the design stage.

Inside -looking inside

Inside -looking inside Inside -looking inside Inside -looking inside Inside -looking inside

The bright rear wall gives the room depth and accentuates the spatial perspective. Illuminated objects in the background achieve a similar effect. If the emphasis of the illuminance level is shifted from the back to the front area of the room, then the focus of attention will also shift from the background to the foreground.
Light makes surfaces or objects visible and allows them to become the focus of attention. Dark spatial zones cause spatial limits to disappear and recede into the background. Differentiated spatial lighting can producea hierarchy of how spaces are perceived. Illuminating vertical surfaces is of particular creative importance for the design since a better effect is achieved as the result of spatial perspective than when illuminating horizontal surfaces.

Inside -looking outside

Inside -looking outside Inside -looking outside Inside -looking outside Inside -looking outside Inside -looking outside

A high illuminance level in the interior combined with a dark exterior creates a strong reflection on the facade plane. The interior visually appears to double in size from the exterior due to the reflection. Objects in the outdoor area are not recognisable. As the illuminance level in the interior decreases and the luminance in the exterior increases, the mirror effect is reduced and objects on the exterior become recognisable.
The reflection on the glass becomes less as the luminance in front of the glass decreases and the luminance behind the glass increases. Well shielded luminaires in front of the glass plane cause less reflection. Lower illuminance in the interior allows better perception of the exterior. When directing luminaries on the exterior, direct glare into the indoor area should be avoided.

Outside -looking inside

Outside -looking inside Outside -looking inside Outside -looking inside Outside -looking inside Outside -looking inside

The high illuminance level of daylight causes a strong reflection on the glass surface. Objects in the indoor area are not perceptable. As the illuminance level in the outdoor area decreases, the reflection becomes less. This allows illuminated objects or surfaces in the indoor area to become visible. The glass is no longer perceptible.
The reflection on the glass becomes less as the luminance in front of the glass decreases and the luminance behind the glass increases. Luminaires in front of the glass that are well shielded and integrated into architecture cause less reflection of themselves. A low illuminance level in the indoor area produces a deep spatial effect at night. The illumination of objects in indoor areas – such as shop windows – requires very high illuminance to make these objects visible during the day due to the high illuminance level outside. Adjusting the indoor lighting to the changing daylight is recommendable. A higher illuminance level during the day and a low level in the evening reduces the contrast.

Outside -looking outside

Outside -looking outside Outside -looking outside Outside -looking outside Outside -looking outside Outside -looking outside Outside -looking outside

A bright rear wall lends depth to the room and helps delineate the room limits. Illuminated objects in the background achieve a similar effect. If the emphasis of the illuminance level is shifted from the back to the front area of the room, then the focus of attention will also shift from the background to the foreground.
Light makes surfaces or objects visible and brings them into the foreground. Dark zones of the room make the room limits disappear and the effect of areas recedes into the background. Due to the low illuminance level at night, the required illuminances are less than for indoor lighting.