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Illuminate objects

Focusing the attention on objects in the room

Light directs our view and focuses the attention on details. The direction of light, illuminance and the light distribution all determine the effect of an object in its surroundings.

Direction of light

Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light Direction of light

Direction of light

Directed light from the front produces a strong modelling ability. Light from above causes the object to cast strong shadows on itself. Light from behind creates a silhouette. The steeper the incident light, the more pronounced the shadow effect.

Direction of light Direction of light

The steeper the incident light, the more pronounced the shadow effect. Objects can be illuminated well when the direction of light is between 5° and 45° to the vertical. The optimal direction of light for illuminating objects is at 30°. This avoids strong reflected glare or undesirable shadows on people or objects.

Highlighting is used for modelling objects in:
- museums
- exhibitions
- sales rooms

Preferred luminaire groups
- spotlights
- floodlights

Combining light from different directions

Combining light from different directions Combining light from different directions Combining light from different directions Combining light from different directions Combining light from different directions

A single accent light produces a strong shadow on an object. Harsh contrasts between light and dark areas can be reduced by combining light from different directions. A strong accent light from one side creates a dominant viewing direction. Complementing the primary frontal light with back-lighting can reveal textures on the rear of the object. Diffuse light from above results in the object appearing less three-dimensional than if illuminated with directed accent light.
Accent light enhances the three-dimensionality of objects. The use of several spotlights reduces the light-dark contrasts on the object, which can make textures more apparent. Lighting of equal power from different sides reduces the three-dimensional effect. The differentiation of illuminance levels with key light, supplemented with a lower intensity fill light and a little back light produces a balanced effect. This lighting concept gives objects a three-dimensional appearance and ensures that areas in shadow can still be appreciated. Important areas are ideally emphasised with key light. Where objects are viewed from all sides, back light on the rear of the object allows the texture to be perceived effectively. Diffuse light - e.g. from a luminous ceiling - can also reduce the harsh contrasts between light and dark areas caused by an accent light and results in objects appearing softer. Lighting solely with undirected, diffuse light will give hardly any shadows and produce a poorly sculptured effect.

Combining light from different directions

Combining light from different directions

The key light is aimed at the object from the front, offset to one side. The fill light is also incident from the front but from the opposite side. The back light illuminates the object from behind. The optimum angle of inclination off the vertical for objects is at around 30°. In this way strong reflections, glare and undesirable shadows on people or other objects are avoided.

Accent lighting to model objects with a combination of lighting directions is used in:
- Museums
- Exhibitions
- Salesrooms

Preferred luminaire groups
- Spotlights
- Floodlights

Vary the light distribution

Vary the light distribution Vary the light distribution Vary the light distribution

Narrow-beam spotlights accentuate the object and make it stand out against the surroundings. The beam of light is stretched into an oval using a sculpture lens. Flood lenses spread out the narrow beam and create a soft brightness gradient.
The narrower the beam of light cast on the object, the stronger the effect. Sculpture lenses are particularly suitable for projecting light at objects over their entire height. With their wide light beam, flood lenses illuminate the surroundings stronger and represent the object in its spatial relationship.

Highlighting is used for modelling objects in:
- museums
- exhibitions
- sales rooms

Preferred luminaire groups
- spotlights with accessories

Accentuate objects

Accentuate objects Accentuate objects Accentuate objects Accentuate objects

Brightness contrast

 

The objects and the wall are given general lighting by wallwashers. Beams from individual spotlights add emphasis to the objects. A higher brightness contrast increases the level of accentuation.
When the brightness contrast of the ambient surroundings to the object is 1:2, a contrast can hardly be noticed. When the ratio is 1:5, a minimum brightness contrast is established between primary and secondary points of interest. A contrast of 1:10 brings out the difference very well. A brightness contrast of 1:100 detaches the object very strongly from its ambient surroundings but an unintentional dissection of the wall can arise.

Highlighting of objects on walls is a practice used in:
- museums
- exhibitions
- trade-fair stands
- sales rooms